Top 10 School Districts in United States Where Students are Most Likely to Fail

Top 10 School Districts in United States Where Students are Most Likely to Fail

Early in 2020, USA Today released a list of the top 50 schools in the United States where students are most likely to not succeed. By taking into account multiple different variables, such as annual per-student spending, child poverty rate, the teacher-to-student ratio, per-pupil spending, the share of adults with a college education, and the high school graduation rate, USA Today compiled a list of the top 50 schools where students are least likely to succeed. 


We at Urban81 believe that all of these factors limit success in our urban students and are constantly looking for opportunities to give to programs and organizations that support equalizing the gap between urban and suburban schools, giving every student, no matter their socioeconomic status, a chance to maximize the individual ability they possess. 


We believe that factors such as per student spending, child poverty rate, and the teacher-to-student ratio rates have a direct impact on high school and college graduation rates. When schools are underfunded, it usually means that they do not receive enough tax revenue from their local region, usually due to a high poverty level. This can create an endless cycle of poor attendance, grades, and schools. Penetrating this endless spiral that is constantly pulling it’s inhabitants in a downward vortex of instability and impoverished socioeconomic structure internally is nearly impossible. 


This is the reason the Urban81 Fund looks to fund outside programs and organizations that are not direct members of the cycle, but rather outside supporters that can permeate a school or neighborhood and bring hope and stability to those entrapped by their unsolicited circumstances. 

According to USA Today, here at the top 10 school districts in the United States where students are most likely to fail

 

  1. Alabama: Chickasaw City Schools

 

  • Annual per student spending: $9,372

 

  • Adults with a bachelor's degree: 14.4%

 

  • Child Poverty Rate - 41.3%



  1. Alaska: Lower Kuskokwim School District

 

  • Annual per student spending: $32,652

 

  • Adults with a bachelor's degree: 13.2%

 

  • Child Poverty Rate - 37.5%



  1. Arizona: Window Rock Unified School District 8

 

  • Annual per student spending: $14,746

 

  • Adults with a bachelor's degree: 11.3%

 

  • Child Poverty Rate - 44.4%



  1. Arkansas: Osceola School District

 

  • Annual per student spending: $12,094

 

  • Adults with a bachelor's degree: 9.1%

 

  • Child Poverty Rate - 40.1%



  1. California: Mendota Unified School District

 

  • Annual per student spending: $11,111

 

  • Adults with a bachelor's degree: 2.1%

 

  • Child Poverty Rate - 57%



  1. Colorado: Las Animas School District

 

  • Annual per student spending: $7,046

 

  • Adults with a bachelor's degree: 10.3%

 

  • Child Poverty Rate - 31.5%



  1. Connecticut: Hartford Public Schools

 

  • Annual per student spending: $19,705

 

  • Adults with a bachelor's degree: 16.8%

 

  • Child Poverty Rate - 34.4%



  1. Delaware: Woodbridge School District

 

  • Annual per student spending: $14,137

 

  • Adults with a bachelor's degree: 13.1%

 

  • Child Poverty Rate - 30%



  1. Florida: Hamilton County School District

 

  • Annual per student spending: $10,976

 

  • Adults with a bachelor's degree: 9.3%

 

  • Child Poverty Rate - 34.3%



  1. Georgia: Stewart County School District

 

  • Annual per student spending: $14,967

 

  • Adults with a bachelor's degree: 11.2%

 

  • Child Poverty Rate - 52%